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Tag Archives: World War Two

Senility Strikes!

3 Mar

March 3, 2014

One of the main responsibilities of Mr. Blog’s Tepid Ride is to inform and entertain. And we do that by mocking, sometimes mercilessly, those who deserve it. In this case, our honoree is a 92 year-old veteran of World War Two. This short letter was written to the New York Daily News (their motto: “We’re Going Downhill Fast and We Know It.”) I’m going to break from my usual policy of using names as this man, while he put his name out there intentionally, should probably be left alone at his age and I’m sure he doesn’t need legion of Mr. Blog fans (is two a legion?) assaulting him on the street.

The reason for this letter is the recent signing by the New York Yankees of Japanese baseball player Masahiro Tanaka, who in just his first weeks as a Yankee comes off as an arrogant ass. He should fit right in on that team. Anyway, here is the letter:

Hicksville, L.I.: As a 92-year-old Depression era baseball fan, I have fond memories of Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig hitting homeruns out of Yankee Stadium. After three years as a combat veteran in the Pacific theater of WWII, I again was an enthusiastic Joe DiMaggio/ Ted Williams-era baseball fan. When Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, I believed then that baseball was truly the all-American sport. Today baseball is flooded with players earning millions of dollars who cannot speak a word of English and need interpreters when interviewed on TV. Even worse, the Japanese are now in the big leagues. After 60 years, I still have not agreed to peace with Japan, due to with the horrid memories of the wartime atrocities they committed still in my brain. In the twilight of my life one of my last pleasures, baseball is now gone.

Well, I can certainly feel for him, right up to where he says today baseball is flooded with players earning millions of dollars who cannot speak a word of English and need interpreters when interviewed on TV.

masahiro-tanaka-2

But then there’s a warning sign: Even worse, the Japanese are now in the big leagues. Uh oh, get ready for the racist rant.

After 60 years, I still have not agreed to peace with Japan, due to with the horrid memories of the wartime atrocities they committed still in my brain.

Funny, I don’t recall FDR asking if you agreed to peace with Japan. I’m pretty sure your signature was not required on the peace treaty. Were you even on the deck of the USS Missouri that day? I’m pretty sure you weren’t standing next to General MacArthur in that famous photo.

However, and this is what worries me about this guy’s sanity, is the last line: In the twilight of my life one of my last pleasures, baseball is now gone.

Tanaka is not the first Japanese player to join the Yankees. Has this guy forgotten that Ichiro Suzuki and Hiroki Kuroda already play for the Yankees? And what about Hideki Irabu, Hideki Matsui, Kei Igawa, and Ryota Igarashi, all of whom played for the Yankees in recent years? Seriously, he just now realized that there are Japanese players on the Yankees?

Please, don’t take this guy to a sushi place or he may beat up the waiter bringing him his California roll.

.

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Today in History: October 3rd, 1955. Captain Kangaroo Debuts

3 Oct

October 3, 2013

On this day in 1955, Captain Kangaroo debuted on television.

Captain Kanagroo

The Captain Kangaroo Show starred Captain Phillip Kangaroo, a World War Two veteran who distinguished himself in the Pacific Theater of operations. During the Battle of Midway, then-Private Kangaroo shoot down five Japanese zeroes and one Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka, thereby becoming an ace on his very first mission.

Pvt. Kangaroo was active in many nighttime operations, often carrying out sensitive reconnaissance missions. It was on one of those missions that he was shot down over Vella Lavella in the Solomon Islands. Captured by the Japanese army, Pvt. Kangaroo was first classified as a p.o.w., but in 1946 was mistakenly listed as dead when a US recon team landed on Vella Lavella and found his flight jacket beside a pile of human bones. It was not until 1948 that the bones were discovered to be the remains of a Pacific Islander to whom Pvt. Kangaroo had generously given his jacket.

After the war, Japan returned Pvt. Kangaroo, along with other prisoners, and Pvt. Kangaroo was bumped up several ranks to Captain.

Beginning in 1955, The Captain Kangaroo Show was a political affairs program that aired early Sunday mornings. Always topical and frequently controversial, The Captain Kangaroo show featured the political pundits and newsmakers of his day. Notable episodes included Kangaroo’s passionate defense of the Vietnam War, and Mr. Green Jeans getting shot at Kent State in 1970.

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